Category Archives: links I like

Some interesting things elsewhere VII


It’s still the first 2 weeks of the school-year over here, which are utter chaos for me as a teacher of protestant religion in Flemish secondary schools, so not much has been happening on this blog. I left this SITE-list half finished at the end of August, so maybe it’s time to finish it and publish it before it loses all relevancy in this constantly changing world.

The random picture today is quite cute. Having small children makes one like cute pictures of fuzzy apes…

Ray Hollenbach on how Jesus welcomes sinners at His table. Who do we welcome at our table?

Morgan Guyton actually has written a lot of posts that are worth reading since my last SITE-list. This one is about submission and leadership.

Thank you Lord for hearing me @ godspace.

2 interesting posts by Jonalyn on soulation. One about egalitarian marriages and one about friendships between men ans women. I still don’t have no idea who the mentioned Sally and Harry are, and I don’t think they’d interest me…

Roger Olson on the problems with John Pipers view of Gods sovereignity and sin.

Busyness as moral lazyness on internetmonk

An orthodox approach to sacrifice and atonement (I guess you all know I find those things very interesting)

Andrew Jones of Tall skinny Kiwi on homeschooling with the whole planet as a home… I wish I could go to all those places to learn those things…

shalom

Bram

Some interesting things elsewhere V


Not much happening here, but at least I have a new SITE- list for my readers:

The ten dogmas of modern science.

The difference between theistic evolutionism and evolutionary creationism on Jesus Creed. I never liked the first term,  and even if I do tend tend to an old earth and biological evolution (as an explanation for what we can find in the material world, which is NOT AT ALL the whole story of the origins of the universe and humanity), I’d never make an ism out of any creatonal view. But I agree that for a Christian affirming the Creator is more important than affirming any scientific theory.

(The problem between ‘creation’ and ‘evolution’ is not a scientfic one, but a metaphysical and philosophic one anyway, and I do like the way in which ‘evolutionary creation’ crosses those false dichotomies..)

Morgan Guyton being provocative again and criticising Tim Keller for creating a false binary of love and holiness. It also shows where I think Guytons Wesleyanism is more in line with both the bible and the great tradition of Christianity than the reformed tradition, but I think some people will not at all agree with that…

David Flowers has a list of five books that, according to him will be very important for the future of North-American Evangelical church in the 21st century . I mioght not be an American but those are important books to wrestle with indeed:

1. N.T. Wright: Surprised by Hope: Rethinking Heaven, the Resurrection, and the Mission of the Church 
2. Scot McKnight: The King Jesus Gospel: The Original Good News Revisited 
3. Frank Viola and Leonard Sweet: Jesus Manifesto: Restoring the Supremacy and Sovereignty of Jesus Christ
4. Greg Boyd: The Myth of a Christian Nation: How the Quest for Political Power is Destroying the Church
5. Christian Smith: The Bible Made Impossible: Why Biblicism is Not a Truly Evangelical Reading of Scripture 

(I read all of those ecxept #4, which might be the book in the list that is most fit for the Americansituation specificall, but I read other things by Boyd and I quite like him)

Rachel Held Evans has a very interesting guest in her ‘ask a…’ series: Ask an Indigenous Theologian.

Justin Lee cfor the gay Christian Network has a very strong point here: Worldliness in the other direction is still worldliness!

Totally unrelated is the news that ebay doesn’t sell magic anymore. I’m not even going to comment on that one…

Richard Beck of experimental theology on the ‘hole rule‘, a good consideration for those who are into simple living…

And then there’s Todd Bentley, still on the other side of the Atlantic ocean

Shalom

Bram

Some interesting things elsewhere III


Yes, that’s me, sitting at the beach at the mouth of most Southern estuary of the river Schelde in the North Sea, in the Netherlands, where we were with the people of our Vineyard church from Antwerp yesterday. As you can see the weather was changing at the moment of taking the picture, and not for the better…

Now onto the new list of ‘Some interesting things elsewhere': I know I’m not disciplined enough, and not able to give my blog enough priority to do this every week like some bloggers do, but here is a new list:

Dianne Anderson  has written an interesting series on C.S. Lewis and platonism(part I, part II, part III) and complementarian use of the shadowlands metaphor. I think she has an interesting point that is much broader than her feminist application, and important in other ways too.  And then Sarah moon has a post on ‘intangible christianity‘, and I understood much more why her point is so important. Christian salvation is not something vague and mystical (in the pejorative sense) that means that somewhere in the heavenly realm your status has been changed, and your sins (actually the punishment for them) has been ‘washed away’ without anything happening here and now, but it is the Inbreaking of the Kingdom of God, ‘already and not yet’, that will only be complete after the Judgment with erasing of all evil. But salvation is something very real here and now!

Josh Hopping has a post about scriptures, politics, and the bootstrap myth, confronting the myth of the ‘do-it-yourself’-person that is even more pervasive in America but endemic to (neo)liberal Western thought but completely unchristian. Something similar from Bill Guerrant on sustainable traditions about American virtues and the seven deadly sins. (And again, what’s said about the US can be broadened to our Western culture in general…)

These stats on the sex industry from treasures in Los Angeles make me very very very sad… Kyrië Eleison! 

Related, Kurt Willems on the Pangea blog asks question ‘can porn be used responsible’, and gives an interesting observation about freedom: “God invites us to allow the Holy Spirit to shape our character to make us look more like Jesus, free from the shackles of longing for someone other than a spouse. Porn never accomplishes this aim in any circumstance.

And for something completely different, Scott Morizot wonders about the influence of Islam on the Western renaissance in general and calvinism in specific. Intriguing idea.

peace

Bram

Random Links I liked lately 1


I don’t know a which frequency I’ll be able to post in this series in the future, but here’s the fist collection of articles, blog posts and other internet stuff I liked lately or at least found interesting… It’s very randomly compiled, chaotic as my mind is, and if no-one reads it it’s still a good way for me to remember those links… Subjects may vary in a lot of unexpected directions, just as in the regular blog…

So here we go:

Am I the only one who likes articles called Scooby-Doo, Where Are You!: On Disenchantment and the Demonic? It could’ve been a Sufjan Stevens song title…

I’ve been blogging recently about Mr. Driscoll and his problem with effeminate worship leaders (still don’t know what that’s supposed to be though) but something probably more troubling is his famous older statement “I cannot worship a guy I can beat up.’ . Dianna E Anderson explains in her blog post A Jesus I can beat up one of the important problems with that statement, and I don’t think you need a hardcore Anabaptist to get the idea that the point of the crucificion is that Jesus just was beaten up…

If this is true it’s really sad and it makes me angy: Monsanto’s Agent Orange Being Used to Clear Brazil’s Rainforest

Some music from a young Belgian band I liked: Lunar rays – do you know Maybe if they played more music like this on the radio, I’d listen to it once in a while…

For those interested in my radish pod curry with tree spinach, and stir-fried daylilies, let google translate do something with the post on my dutch blog with the recipes. (Which might be very funny bad English) Or just look at the photographs…

Also very interesting for those who like philosphical theology: An Open Theism Theodicy by David D. Flowers: Gregory Boyd on the Problem of Evil. I like this approach…

I used to hate this song when I was a teenager. Now I just find it very strange but slightly entertaining. There are some gabber influences, a phenomenon was something with very fast techno music and weird bald people that only did exis in the benelux mainly in the nineties.

I love this new album by the restoration project, which can be listened and bought @ bandcamp It’s a beautiful concept album based on the beautitudes. I reviewed it for cultuurshock.net, but again only for those who can read the noble dutch language…

Some false gods are really dumb and annoying, like igod, the chat-bot.

Possibly my favorite Christian female blogger Rachel Held Evans has a point with her waring ‘Beware of overcorrecting‘!

One timeless piece from the onion: Rock Fans Outraged As Bob Dylan Goes Electronica

Michael Gungor isn’t only a very interesting musician who wrote the God is not a white man song that I post on my facebookwall sometimes, but he writes very interesting blog posts too, like this one called Love and Justice about God beling love and how it connects to His justice…

The End of the Sexual Revolution, or in case you haven’t noticed, almost all of these songwriting insiders writing the soundtrack for teen femininity are middle-aged men.

That’s all for today folks

God bless

Bram