Category Archives: music

Billy Corgan on Christian rock and more…


BCBilly Corgan, (or is is Willie now?), singer of the grunge band the smashing pumpkins, has done a pretty interesting interview with CNN in Hong Kong earlier this month. The whole transcript is here.

One part from it has been going round, and is about God as the future of rock, and his message to Christian rockers:

RAJPAL: So what are you exploring now?
CORGAN: God. I once did – a big American magazine was doing a thing called, “The Future of Rock”.
RAJPAL: Yes.
CORGAN: And, you know, they asked 50 artists, “What’s the future of rock?” And my answer was, “God”. And they said, “What do you mean?” And I said, “Well, God’s the third rail of -” What is it? “Social security is the third rail of politics in America”. Well, God is the third rail in rock and roll. You’re not supposed to talk about God. Even though most of the world believes in God. It’s sort of like, “Don’t go there”. I think God’s the great, unexplored territory in rock and roll music. And I actually said that. I thought it was perfectly poised. And, of course, they didn’t put it in the interview.
RAJPAL: What would you say to Christian rockers, then?
CORGAN: Make better music. (LAUGHTER) CORGAN: Personally, my opinion – I think Jesus would like better bands, you know? (LAUGHTER) CORGAN: Now I’m going to get a bunch of Christian rock hate mail.
RAJPAL: But that’s interesting -
CORGAN: Just wait, here’s a better quote -
RAJPAL: Yes.
CORGAN: Hey, Christian rock, if you want to be good, stop copying U2. U2 already did it. You know what I mean? There’s a lot of U2-esque Christian rock.
RAJPAL: Sure.
CORGAN: Bono and company created the template for modern Christian rock. And I like to think Jesus would want us all to evolve.

I’m not in touch with the modern commercial Christian rock scene, nor do I live in a country where one can find a Christian rock radio station on a car radio,  but I do think what he’s speaking about, even though I have heard more third-generation Coldplay clones in Christian rock lately than U2-sounds, but whatever.

Maybe that’s indeed the overall idea of Christian rock you get from the radio, but that doesn’t mean that there’s a lot of people, adherents to the Christian religion,, making rock music or something like that which is informed by their faith soemwhere, and who do not sound at all like the mentioned U2 (or coldplay) rip-offs. They might not get as much airplay and sell as much records, but they are musically much more interesting. And Billy Corgan must know that, having Jeff Schroeder in his current band  line-up (who has been part of the Christian indie scene, and played guitars on the violet burning’s selftitled album).

Mr. Corgan himself has been singing about God and other religious themes since the beginning of the Smashing Pumpkins, but does not seem to tie himself down to one religion, even though he appears to be more spiritual than ever.

What also struck me is how he describes his old band, the original line-up of the smashing pumpkins:

we were four strangers who agreed on a musical vision. And we did more harm than good.

And then he identifies one of the problems of that band as ‘false loyalty’:

I would say the key experience for me, from the original version Smashing Pumpkins was, “What is loyalty?” What is loyalty? Because I had a false concept of loyalty and I rode that ship all the way to the bottom. When most people wiser than I, would have jumped off the ship when it was to their benefit.

So people always say, “What’s your greatest career regret?” It’s when the band blew up in ’96, that I didn’t jump off and make a new ship. I rode that ship all the way to the bottom. Like, literally, until it was like the bubbles were coming up and I was sitting there like -

RAJPAL: Is it kind of like, you know, when you’re staying in a bad relationship, that you’re always hoping that something will change. That things will work out in some way, shape, or form.

CORGAN: Yes. I’m sure you’ve only had successful relationships, but I mean, if you’ve ever been there where you’re breaking up with somebody for the ninth time – [..] We did a lot of that. We didn’t really break up so much as we were like, “OK, now it’s going to be like this, or it’s going to be like this”. And then, of course, nothing would change.

Another idea that could be interesting to think about is his rejection of the very well-known dogma that suffering is good for art. I actually have never seen that one questioned before, and it’s even more interesting that he uses an Eastern religion -shintoism- to make that point. I don’t know why he uses shintoism and not Buddhism here, which is based on the elimination of suffering, and does not see a positive role for it.

Makes one wonder if the ‘suffering is good for art’ is born in Christian ideas about suffering. And if it’s indeed as valid as we all suppose…

CORGAN: There’s a long established concept that gets bandied about, which is “Misery makes for great art”. And I actually think this is – if we were asking a Shinto Monk, I think they would laugh at this idea
RAJPAL: Yes.
CORGAN: Because you’re basically saying, “Suffering’s good for business”. And I don’t think suffering’s good for business. Crazy’s good for business, suffering isn’t. I think suffering or the gestalt of, “Here I am, ripping my heart open” – I think that lasts for about two or three albums.
RAJPAL: Yes.
CORGAN: At some point, you have to mature into the deeper work. Most people are living lives of sort of survival. And constantly posing an existential crisis, either through fantasy or oblivion, really has been pretty much explored in rock and roll. At least in the western version of rock and roll. Maybe not over here in Asia, but we’ve sort of, kind of, been through all that.

I wonder if his ‘deeper work’ as he sees it himself will ever be able to reach as much people as ‘mellon collie and the infinite sadness’, which was one of my favorite rock-albums in the nineties, but I must say that his last CD ‘oceania’ is not bad at all and better than most things I’ve heard from him from the nineties!
But it seems like he is not concerned with getting that success back.

Well, if you make repressed, middle class, white, suburban, existential crisis music and a bunch of people just like you buy it, is that success? [...]  I mean, yes, it’s success in the form of communication. But is it success in being true? No, it’s not true. It’s true to its corner, but it’s not true.

Maybe it’s just me, but the guy says a lot of things (some of which I’m not even talking about here) that are really worth contemplating.. Rockstars can be interesting sometimes, don’t they?

peace

Bram

(PS: normal blogging schedule might resume somewhere in September)

Musical fridays 2: Charles and the white trash European blues connection.


A while ago I announced a series of ‘musical fridays’, so here’s the second post, with a very obscure song, ‘Americans’ by ‘Charles and the white trash European blues connection’ taken from my ‘song in my head’ posts on facebook…

Hidden somewhere in my CD collection iconnections an obscure CD in a paper case with a picture of the back of some strange guy with the words ‘Charles and the white trash European blues connection’ on it. It’s not at all that clear anywhere whether that’s the name of the band, or the name of the Cd, or both… On the CD if you care to listen to a lot of noise can be found, which is supposed to be music, and that opccupies a niche somewhere in between blues and garage rock, sometimes with a light industrual feel even. There’s not that much information on the case, just the names of band members and stuff like that, and it can be noted that the whole album has been recorded and mixed on one afternoon on april 2nd in 1998. I suspect that it was not the most sober afternoon in those musicians’ lives, but that might just be a prejudice…

There also is a sticker on it with a single name, ‘Arno’, probably a later addiction from the record company to clarify a bit about the CD so they could be able to sell at least a few copies of this record. I’m not sure much copies of it were ever sold, and I even suspect it is out of print now. It’s one of those records that went forgotten in the history of rock’n roll…

All of this doesn’t mean that the ‘Arno’ guy isn’t a big name in the wonderous world of Belgian rock’n roll. The so-called Arno, full name Arno Hintjens, is a well-known Belgian rock-singer, who was the frontman of a band called TC Matic in the seventies/eighties, a noisy band whose greatest hits are called putain putain and oh la la la. But he is also known for his solo music, which is quite variable. He’s the kind of rockstar with a broken voice that sounds like he’s always drunk (or worse) and who sometimes can sound quite inspired on one song, and in the next song just makes plain dumb music. (I thik of a song like bathroom singer, and yes I am a madness fan and still I find this very dumb music) A lot of his songs are in French, and in a surreal twist of weirdness the guy has even been given the knighthood (the title of “Knight in the Arts and Literature” actually) for what he has done for the French language by the French government. Don’t ask me… Europe can be a pretty weird place sometimes if you think about it..

Back to that CD… I don’t like everything Arno has recorded, but I’ve always liked that ‘Charles and the white trash European blues connection’ album a lot, and not only because it’s a good CD to scare guests with… It is one of the albums that brought me alive through my twentysomething years… A very pure form of very basic rock’n roll with a heavy groove and a very raw form of the blues… And still a CD to put on very loudly, as loudly as possible, when my wife isn’t home… but it’s so obscure now I can’t find any of it on youtube except for this Kinks cover ‘death of a clown‘. 6 out of 10 songs are here on grooveshark though…

A song that always stood out for me is the last song, called ‘Americans’, which is a simple tune about the things Americans gave us (Europeans), a subject I’ve been thinking about lately. The music is raw and the vocals are tormented, and very pure, and the lyrics are a bit random and filled with ‘explicit content’ of the type we have been importing from the US a lot…

And now that we’re here, just listen to their version of the old delta blues classic ‘you got to move‘. It won’t get more industrial and garage than this, but then there’s that really incredible harmonica solo, wow…

So, am I the only one who likes Charles and the white trash European blues connection?

peace

Bram

Musical fridays 1: I still haven’t found what I’m looking for (U2)


Music has always been important to me, and that’s why I want to start a series on the music that has inspired me through my life, in many different ways. some music has inspired me as a musician, while other music has been an influence on me as a person, or widened my view spiritually or philosophically.

I hope to be able to post a song with a short story every 2 weeks, and the other week I will do something similar but a bit different, but you’ll have to wait until next week for the details…

Let’s start with ojoshuane of my favorite songs from my teenage years. While the radio mostly played electronic dance music and the people in school followed that trend or listened to more hard music and alternative rock, I mostly followed my fathers record collection, and listened to stuff like U2 and Bob Dylan. Yes, maybe not that original, but not much people my age (except for my friend MM) were into that stuff at all at the time, so in a way I was a rebel… When I was older I developed a taste for more obscure music and lesser-known names and weird sounds, but the starting point of my musical journey was there with U2 and Dylan.

One of my favorite songs has always been, and will always be U2′s ‘I still haven’t found what I’m looking for’, a song I have blogged about before.

For the spiritual significance, see the blog post I linked to. For the musical significance, just listen to it: to the rhytm, the functional minimalism of the electric guitar and the use of the delay-effect on it, and the passion in Bono’s voice. This is a kind of music that only works because the musicians are giving everything, and without that the song would not be interesting, and it’s actually quite simple.

I have no idea of any influence of the 80′s songs of U2 can be found in my music at all, but I’ve listened to them a lot…

Next week we’ll have another version of these music posts, a series on one of my favorite bands that more people need to know about, and in 2 weeks we’ll have another song that has influenced me a lot in these musical Friday series…

peace

Bram

Some old critique to ‘true love waits’ and Joshua Harris…


true love waits
and that’s okay
but you seem to spend your time waiting
ain’t that extremely frustrating?

(the irresistible 21st century virgin boy)

Last week I had a serious flu and I was quite sick, and not able to do much at all, not even reading or thinking, so I was lying on my bed listening to old CD’s with demo songs that I recorded years ago, when I still used the nick/artist name ‘the irresistible 21st century virgin boy’*. One of the old CD’s contained a song I kissed waiting goodbye that I thought was lost forever, one of my earlier attempts to do something with beats and guitars together in a real song. But it also  vocalised  some critique to a book I mentioned in a recent post (‘I kissed dating goodbye’ by Joshua Harris), and I suppose more broadly to the rhetoric of the people of ‘true love waits’ , who then haTLW2d a Flemish division here in Belgium that sent me a lot of news letters because I once had carelessly signed one of their pledge cards on some christian event. (It seems they’re out of the running now though , can’t find anything of them anymore lately…)

The song itself was dismissed later because I hated how I hadn’t been able to find a really fitting melody on the sometimes quite random chord progressions. Re-listening there’s something in it that I like, and some things that I hate (that really bad word flow of the ‘don’t concentrate’ part for example.) But is was a good try, even if it got forgotten without ever been played again…

[please listen to the song 'I kissed waiting goodbye' here https://soundcloud.com/bram-cools/i-kissed-waiting-goodbye (lyrics are there also) and tell me; does it suck completely, or is there still something interesting about it?]

The title ‘I kissed waiting goodbye’ does not mean that I (with my weird artist name) had any problem with the idea of sex as belonging into a marriage relationship (I still believe in that, even though I don’t think a state marriage has much to do necessarily with the definition of marriage) but the whole imported ‘purity culture’ had some exaggerations that I found quite weird. And the local people that preached it were quite peculiar specimens too btw… The emphasis on waiting and not doing stuff was what was getting on my nerves…

Like I said earlier in my recent post a purity culture I don’t know, some of the critiques to ‘evangelical purity culture’ I’ve seen lately are describing something I don’t recognise at all, but I did have my concerns with what I did see. If I would have encountered weirdos like the 2 creeps in Sarah Moons latest blogpost my concerns would’ve been a lot bigger. And it might be that I didn’t even register some of the things that didn’t make sense to me, I think that’s how I never picked up those gender roles in Harris’ book if they are there. my brain didn’t even notice them because they made no sense to me, and they got thrown with the ‘this is too American’** garbage bin.

(Remember that an ‘American writer’ for me is as distant and exotic as an Italian cardinal, and Indian Sadhu  or an African Touareg songwriter…)

The whole movement always was a bit too obsessed with sex for my taste. (an obsession with having no sex all the time is just a weird form of sex-obsession.) It seemed like all they wanted to talk about was how to not have sex, and that was not what I was looking for, I was looking for how to actually grow in my relationship in all kinds of areas. All that talk about what not to do is not good for building a relationship. what people need is positive advice about to grow in love, and not just sexually!!!! there’s much more to a relationship than that, and focussing a relationship on that will make it unbalanced, be it a relationship focussed solely on sex or one focussed solely on avoiding sex …

One of the things I probably dismissed as otherworldy nonsense was the idea of ‘never being alone with someone of the other sex’, including the one you’re not yet married to but having a relationship with. As someone who had been always single with a lot of female friends some of which I saw alone regularly such things just didn’t make sense and didn’t get registered in my brain. It was not something that could convince me anymore than the idea that Belgium does not exist… (It would never haver worked with me and my wife either)

Another point that I found troubling was that I did not see how filling people with a ‘no sex’ message and conditioning them all the time to not touch and not be intimate would ever be reversed on a wedding night. I was too realistic to believe such a thing, whatever promises of ‘great sex lives for those who wait’ were gives. I just didn’t see that happen with such an obsessive attitude. And I later read a lot of articles that affirmed, sometimes from people who were completely blocked down sexually, so it wasn’t a false concern… I know it did work for other people, but I who was already blocked on sex and completely turned off by a world around me that seemed to sell sex on every corner but no love was more traumatised about sex on that moment. And in need of simple honest not overly sexual intimacy. It would actually take years of very slowly growing in intimacy before I would even be ready for sex and by that time I’d be ready to get married too.

By the way, there is something really problematic about all the weirdness this kind of movements does attach to the Christian ideas about sex and marriage. There is something dangerous about a good idea or a truth being hijacked by people who exaggerate in preaching it, and lump it together with nonsense and worse… It might work as a really good vaccination to ever believe it again. Those preached to who are first convinced but later see that the ballast is nonsense will most likely throw away the child with the bathwater… (an example of that here)
See also Ken Ham and his weird form of young earth creationism as litmus test for Christianity…

But let’s close with what I think is important about true love: it loves! And loving is not about not doing things, but about doing things. Apophatic theology (saying things about God by saying what He is not) can be an interesting way to communicate truth about God, but not doing certain things is not the essence of any form of love, and if it is you’re distracted from the real thing…

peace

Bram

* There was something sarcastic in that name, mainly the ‘irrestistible’ part… I’ve been single and eh, extremely celibate until I was 22 or so.

** Nothing racist about that. Other cultures always have things that are found to be nonsense and irrelevant by outsiders. But I do think I can indeed say that ‘too American’ is a valid reason for a lot of Europeans to  dismiss something…

Bram Cools : ‘Noisetrade essential songs sampler’ now available for free download!


The list of ‘essential Bram Cools songs for dummies‘ that I’ve posted a while ago is now available for free download (unless you want to pay, that’s possible too) on noisetrade:

You can listen and get Noisetrade sampler 2it here

Tracklist for the ‘Bram Cools Noistrade essential songs’ sampler:

    1. Coca cola
    2. Father I’m tired
    3. Unfair competition
    4. Qualities
    5. Key
    6. Doos vol cornflakes
    7. I’m not flirting
    8. Praise the Lord
    9. Nettle fields
    10. Consumer’s delight
    11. Albatross (indie-folk mix)
    12. The chosen one
    13. My old name (original tape mix)

(And yes, the artwork is loosely based on the first verse of the first song, but those were aliens that did come over to paint circles (and more) in the fields, not just to drink coca-cola)

enjoy

Bram

Bram Cools music for dummies: some essential songs


My Bram Cools music project might be on a hiatus at the moment for the live-music part, but in between a lot of other things he’s still working on making more of his music available and finally finishing some recordings. From lo-fi to experiment, and from protest-songs to weird instrumentals or raw psalms, with everything in between except for coloring in the lines of professionalism or recording something that would sell to a wide audience…

For those unfamiliar with the music of Bram Cools who get lost in all those weird names of songs, albums and EP’s on the current bandcamp site we have made a list of ‘essential’ songs, ranging from the time of crappy tapes to now. (This is not a definitive list, ask another day and you might get a complete different list…) The most of these songs are from the compilation I am the Belgian Christian lo-fi scene  which is some kind of best-of album, and the more recent electronic full-album cyberluddism

Both albums, and all other albums and songs, can be downloaded for a chosen price or for free on bandcamp. Together they would form some kind of best-of album…

the songs:

my old name:
This might not be the oldest song available here, but it surely is the oldest recording. A quiet lo-fi folk song recorded on one take on a cassette tape, probably somewhere around 2000, and the only song of that era that still gets played live regularly.

coca cola:
This one is actually from Brams teenage years, but it has never been recorded until it was re-recorded a few years ago for the ‘I am the Belgium Christian lo-fi scene’, to become almost radio-friendly…

father I am tired:
One of the fist examples of multitrack-madness, and a live favorite of the Contemporary Christian Muzak collective. It is in no way a very conventional song, but it seems to be one of the most popular Bram Cools songs nonetheless.

unfair competition:
A song about the way iin which we view women, dedicated to the late Marilyn Monroe, that used to be a live favorite. Here is the original version, an arrangement that has never been played live with some primitive guitar solos. An electronic remix of the song can be found on cyberluddism too.

qualities:
Another one of those examples of multitrack  madness, resulting in baroque lo-fi indiefolk. Also a live favorite of the CCM collective, and the first Bram Cools composition that was written in 5/8.

key:
Basically a simple indiefolk song with some weird synth thrown in, but it seems like a lot of people like this one.

doos vol cornflakes:
Yes, a song in Dutch with as title ‘box full of cereal’, with a weird half-electronic arrangement. The parallels with the ancient book of Job were not intended.

I’m not flirting:
Revisiting teenage loneliness with strange backwards drumsamples, and 2 and a half repetitive guitar chords and a broken accordion. (see also this blogpost)

praise the Lord:
In 2007 I recorded a record in one moth for the RPM challenge, based on old liturgical texts, resulting in a weird mix of styles and languages. This one is a psalm which got caught in a 5/8 avanthop kind of thing, and is probably the only time I really got to rapping.

nettle fields:
‘Cyberluddism’ was the next real full album, and a department from folky sounds, with a lot of electronics, soundscapes and a topical exploration of our technological society. Nettle fields has a dark eigthies-feel mixed with some guitarnoise in the background and a lot of postmodern confusion.

consumer’s delight:
This song from ‘cyberluddism’ is the most listened Bram Cools song on bandcamp. An aggressive noisy electronic punksong arranged with gameboy-sounds and very primitive beats.

albatross:
Originally a folk song, but it appeared on ‘cyberluddism’ in a dance-mix. Later an indiefolk-version appeared together with 3 other mixes (a trance version, a slowed down triphop version and some unnamed electronic mix) on a remix-single.

the chosen one:
The most recent one in the list, some years old but finished and released in 2013 as a 2-song single together with the dark ‘byte of my byte, pixel of my pixel’. A hint of electro, classic rock and some kind of poppy electro, and the tragic tale of a failed hero.

Edit: After this song was written the 10-song EP ‘Instant pocket apocalypse’ was released including at least one song that might fit in a best-of compilation: missing all pixels

2 new Bram Cools songs


I haven’t been playing music for ages it seems, which has something to do with a small baby and stuff like that. But listening to old recordings I decided it is time to finish a lot of almost-finished and half-finished songs before making new ones… Which led to the bandcamp release of 2 songs I’ve been working on since forever… They’re not my usual style (if such a thing exists) so I just bundled them into a two-song single.

The first song is some dark metal-without-the-metal thingy about the way in wich images of women are used in our digital country. The second one is an electronic rock tune about a failed postmodern savior. At one moment I thought about including those 2 songs in my cyberluddism album, but they didn’t fit…

Both songs can be listened and downloaded here on my bandcamp.

BYTEtext

byte of my byte, pixel of my pixel

softly spoken to my eyes
images of naked flesh they tell intimate lies
how could I want her if she’s not mine
how could I want her If she doesn’t even exist
how could I want her

and this game will always go on
in this world Venus is just a slave of Mammon
how do I fight against those evil gods
oh lust in the eye only also is adultery yes it is

softly spoken these intimate lies
could I just not turn away my eyes
why should I look at her if she’s not mine
why should I look at her if she doesn’t even exist
why should I look

and this game will always go on
in this world Venus is just a slave of Mammon
how do I fight against those evil gods
oh lust in the eye only also is adultery it is
oh beautiful re-creation oh sweet deception
byte of my byte and pixel of my pixel

The chosen one

Am I the chosen one
who’s gonna save the world
am I the chosen one
from the ancient prophecy
they all told me that I was the one
they all believe will deliver
they all see something that I’m not
And I’m here face to face with evil

I’m just a pointless stupid postmodern guy
on opium for the people I’ve always been so high
distraction much more pointless than the most deformed religion
I’ve wasted my whole life and now I’m ready for nothing
the great nothing

I’m not chosen one
that was gonna save the world
I was not the chosen one
from their stupid prophecy
they still think  that I was the one to save them from evil
they still believe that I will deliver the way their fairy tales told them
but here I’m being  torn into pieces
it wasn’t me they needed to fight this evil

I was just a pointless stupid postmodern idiot
I didn’t learn a thing, I cannot use their stupid magical sword
and now the world must end, and evil will take over forever
I’ve wasted the world  I wasn’t ready for nothing

should I’ve been the chosen one
that could’ve saved the world

enjoy

Bram

“Father I feel”, or cyndi McCoy playing “Father I’m tired”


When you make songs you also create the possibility for people to play them themselves and do their own thing with it. This is a beautiful rendition of “Father I’m tired” by Cyndi McCoy:

Enjoy!

Bram

Musical interlude: Step into the madness (Larry Norman)


I was listening to the grandfather of christian rock lately, and I found this song about his homeland quite scary, and parts of it might be as relevant as they were when the song was released in 1991…

I must say that I do disagree with a lot of Larry’s theology, and that some of his ideas can be quite weird from time to time, but on other moments he can be incredible spot on, like in this song…

Step into the madness of a million city streets
Where dealers sell white powder and children stand and bleed
Where local gangs are vicious and cops are so impure
That schoolboys carry Uzis so they’ll feel secure.

Where fathers rape their daughters and beat up on their sons
Until the mother tries to stop him and goes and buys a gun
Where the local church is closed except a couple times a week
And turns its face from all the homeless in the street.

This is America, land of the free
Everyone gets justice and liberty, if you got the money.

Bankers and controllers make deals on foreign shores
And the CIA ships heroin to finance their secret wars
They sell the madmen weapons then send soldiers to their land
And in the name of God we battle for all the oil under the sand.

This is America, land of the free
Everyone gets justice and liberty, if you got the money.

Step into the madness as a thousand points of light
Illuminate the warheads for the final fight.
Step into the madness, say your prayers and drink your tea
Get ready for a kinder, gentler world war three.

This is America, land of the free
Everyone gets justice and liberty, if you got the money.

‘Sketches for a liturgy’ available again!


And now some news from the Bram Cools music front. For those who don’t know, I do make music, but not everyone is going to like it since it’s a bit rough and weird sometimes… (Listen to an older compilation called ‘I am the Belgian Christian lo-fi scene’ for example to get an idea…)

Years ago, in 2007, I took the RPM challenge, and recorded an album in a month (februari even, the shortest)! It don’t think it’ll ever reach the top-40 though (none of my music ever will I’m afraid…) since it was a weird, raw, lo-fi and not very professional concept album loosely based on the classical liturgies. It had all kind of weird musical styles, and was sung in a lot of different languages (Dutch, English, Latin, Greek, 2 words of Hebrew and one word of French) There was an electronic repetitive Kyrië, an avant-hop psalm of praise (in 5/8 meter), a lo-fi folk self-written creed, etc…

I made some home-’pressed’ CD-R’s’ at the time, but they have been ‘out of print’ since forever, and the music has been unavailable for quite some years now… I never even dared to listen to it because I was afraid that I’d hate it for being rcorded too hastily, and since I lost the tracks in a computer crash, I’d never been able to rework them again either.

Listening again years later I don’t find it that bad, so I decided to make it available again, with some songs slightly remastered.

And the re-release is… Tararara…

NOW!

From now on it can be downloaded via the ‘Gloria in Te Domine‘ bandcamp site, where I want to share my more ‘religious’-minded music (like worship, praise, gospel, meditative and liturgical stuff, if I’d ever be able to play such stuff….) You can get it for free or choose to pay for it if you like… And if you like soundcloud more, you can also find it here.

Tracklist for Bram Cools – sketches for a liturgy:

13. Amen
So you can all download the album in the format you like for free or for the price you like …. If you want to use them and need chords or lyrics or so, please contact me…
Anyone who likes any of the songs?
shalom
Bram