on the evilness of Rebecca StJames and evangelical paranoia…


So today for some reason I was listening to some good old contemporary christian music on youtube. And then I saw the following comment under a live video of Rebecca StJames’ song ‘go and sin no more‘:

This kind of music is too worldly. That’s why Evangelicals are leaving the faith because of worldly music like this. This kind of music follows the genre of worldly secular music and creates a brain frequency that keeps the mind locked into this world. That’s why it’s so spiritually dangerous. The Illuminati and Freemasons created “Christian rock,” to numb people down and lead them into apostasy. This is occuring today. Only 9% of Evangelicals adults hold to a biblical worldview.

This leaves me with a lot of questions:

So this music creates a brain frequency that keeps the mind locked in this world? Should I use trance music that creates a brain frequency that brings me into another world then??

The illuminati and freemasons created Christian rock? That’s a new one… It would explain why there is so much bad christian music in the world though…

And where does the statistic of 9% come from? And what is a biblical worldview? There’s nothing in the bible about rock music, illuminati, brain waves or the freemasons…

But I guess I’m already part of the great apostacy, since I prefer most secular rock and folk and indie above this RSJ song musically… My poor brainwaves…

 

 

Advertisements

4 responses to “on the evilness of Rebecca StJames and evangelical paranoia…

  1. This is so sad. Maybe the flight from evangelicalism is due to those rantings about the Illuminati and Freemasons and their influence, can the aliens or worse, Voldemart, be far behind?

  2. When Paul was on Mars Hill he noted that gentiles are a “superstitious” (or “religious” people). How true. The person above probably thinks he/she is one who truly trusts the Bible alone… as he/she touts a “brain frequency” argument to oppose CCM. I wonder how we’re supposed to test brain frequencies against scripture.

    And I chuckle at the “secret plan” behind CCM (whether earthly or Satanic)… if that was the plan, they did a lousy job! Thanks for the post.

  3. “bad christian music”….? If a song is spreading the message of John 3:16 how dare you state “bad christian music” unless you are referring to songs that are so noisy, that one cannot hear the artist actually spreading the message of John 3:16.

    “since I prefer most secular rock and folk and indie above this RSJ song musically”
    Since you prefer that over Rebecca St. James’ music, then why does the comment bother you? The comment is stating that Rebecca’s music sounds secular and from your post, you like secular. What’s the problem?

    “So this music creates a brain frequency that keeps the mind locked in this world? Should I use trance music that creates a brain frequency that brings me into another world then??”
    Ignorance really isn’t bliss.

    “There’s nothing in the bible about rock music, illuminati, brain waves or the freemasons…”
    Obviously. The Bible was written ages ago before these words were entered into the Oxford dictionary. There is however a connection between music and the spiritual world. Please read the account of kings David and Saul.

    “But I guess I’m already part of the great apostacy”
    He that is not with Me is against Me; and he that gathereth not with Me scattereth abroad. – Jesus Christ (Matthew 12:30)

  4. The comment bothers me because it makes in no way sense to me. And I don’t see where you’re coming from with yours either I’m affraid.

    Making music just to spread a message is undermining both the music and the message sometimes, and it isn’t even honest in some cases… The evangelical way of using music just as a bait to ‘trick’ people into hearing the gospel is just a form of dishonest propaganda and it cheapens whatever message you want to bring. And a lot of non-Christian people will see right through that.

    Surely ‘bad’ music is subjective and culturally relative, I think we would have a hard time accomodating our ears if we had a way to listen to King David playing on his old Eastern string instrument… But a lot of contemporary Christian music sound like bad second-rate copycats of secular music, and stuff just made for the lowest common denominator. which is an insult for the gospel. (There is much more to be told than John 3:16 anyway, otherwise we wouldn’t have had a whole bible, a lot of psalms are more like the blues than like happy clappy hallelujah songs.)

    I’m secular? Well I live in a post-catholic country where evangelicalism is too small to create a Christain ghetto like you have in America, so the only non-secular place would be one of the few monasteries that we have left. I don’t believe in a secular/spiritual divide anyway. Everything in your life belongs to god, and God should influence both what you’re doing in the world as in the church. so I don’t care for that divide…

    I would not know what makes music ‘secular’ or not. It’s cultural anyway. Aks people here what kind of music they would see as ‘spiritual’ and they would most likely refer to Gregorian Chants or black gospel, or maybe Bach. Someone from another coulture would maybe refer to the pop/gospel worship pentecostels have imported everywhere, or old liturgical chants… I have no idea what kind of music you or the writer of the comment would like to hear anyway, so I can’t even discuss it. It’s just irrelevant.

    I wouldn’t deny that there is some kind of connection between music and the spiritual world. But I also know that this is a very personal thing, some people are affected by the same music in totally different ways as others are, and it’s also true that different people are affected by different things. Some people are affected by lyrics a lot, other by the atmosphere of the music. There is no general rule in this.

    And sorry, the brainwave stuff is just pseudo-scientific nonsense. some of the most spiritual music (like gregorian chanting and sacred harp singing) has a very hige trance factor, most probably deliberatly, to make the connection with god easier. So what’s the point anyway?

    And my remark about the great apostacy was highly cynical… I would rather say this kind of fringe fundamentalism has not much christianity left…

    peace

    Bram

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s