Should I summon ‘Charlie’, the Mexican demon?


“I’m so not ready for the ’10’s.”

I think I said that for the first time earlier this month when I received an email for coldplay being in a musical version of ‘game of thrones’. And I’ve been saying it several times since. The last time was yesterday, when reading about the ‘Charlie Charlie challenge’. (google is your friend, I’m not going to link it!). I was even in the Flemish newspapers in my own language! A viral kids game involving pencils and summoning Charlie the Mexican demon….

Wait, what was that last one?

Well, it seems like the current hype among teenagers on the internet is ‘Charlie Charlie challenge’, a ‘game’ consisting of summoning some entity called ‘Charlie’ (said to be a Mexican demon) using something that can best be described as a very primitive spirit board  consisting of 4 words scribbled on a paper, and 2 pencils.

Yes you read that correctly: a ‘Mexican demon’ called ‘Charlie’ (not even Carlos) is called upon through a rudimentary ouicharlieja-board-like device that anyone can make in 2 seconds. Just write rite yes, ye, no no on the 4 corners of a piece of paper and let 2 pencils balance on each other and you’re ready to contact said entity. And that’s going viral as a game among teenagers…

Oh, and if you’re too 2015 to use prehistoric means as paper and pencils you can buy an app for it too. (Because using your phone as a portal to the demonic does not sound at all like the plot for a bad supernatural thriller?°)

Like I said, I’m so not ready for the ’10’s…

Let’s not go into the dumb name. (Would a ‘Mexican demon’ not rather have a name in Spanish, or Nahuatl some local language?) Because that’s too dumb to react too.

There’s more interesting questions. It seems impossible to find the origin of this stuff (will it turn out to be a viral marketing campaign?) so some things about it are not that clear.

The question why people think it a good idea to summon ‘Mexican demons’ named Charlie is probably one that is not asked by everyone, but isn’t a very bad question either. (hint: it might not at all be a good idea…) But then again teenage hypes on the internet can be pretty bad ideas, and facebook drinking games are not harmless either.

One of the things that I found a while ago when reading up on the occult is that a lot of occultists (and other people that are seen as ‘into the occult’ by Christians who have an enormous fear of such things) will also warn against the use of ouija-boards, or about summoning spirits and entities without knowing what the hell you’re messing with…

(I don’t think I need to quote bible versions here to provide ‘proof’ for Christians that summoning demons or spirits might be a bad idea. You’ve all seen those before probably and google is still your friend…)

So, the big question:  what’s on the other side of the line, if there’s anything at all (results will probably vary)?

Sometimes it will be just gravity and chance probably.
But at least from some videos (not linking, watch at your own risk. And don’t get infected by stupidity…) it seems that the Charlie Charlie challenge might actually in some instances work to contact ‘something’ that answers questions. And that also plagues people with some minor paranormal bullying if you don’t say goodbye properly to close the connection. Yes, evidently, ancient Mexican demons want their customers to be polite…
(Or maybe it’s just better to break off the connection and don’t keep the line open after connecting a paranormal entity? If you can completely get rid of it after inviting it that is…)

So what is it that shows up for a game of ‘je suis Charlie’ when the invited guest actually shows up?

Like I said before, I expect the results to be varied. Is there an actual demon behind it with a cunning plan to lure dumb teenagers to the caverns of hell with a lot of minions called Charlie? I don’t know. Sounds a bit too conspiracy-ish to me actually. But who knows what kind of evil plot there is behind this.. (Like a marketing strategy or so. Mammon might be the most dangerous demon for the state of the planet anyway currently…)

Is it any nearby entity that can use the occasion? Not a very good idea either then… Don’t open portals to the spiritual dimension to invite things  you don’t know that clearly operate under a false identity, when you don’t even know what you’re doing. (Even a bit of an occultist would probably learn some protection and banishment spells before doing such a thing…*).

Or was there initially nothing but did the game call Charlie into existence as a thoughtform-being? (In which case he might be a quite powerful egregore by now, and probably a bit bored from answering dumb questions from teenagers all the time.)

I have no intention to find out actually. I just want the ’10’s to be over as soon as possible at the moment… And the answer to my question in the title is probably clear by now…

Simply said: NO!

Btw, when I looked for how people who are more into the occult react to the whole thing,they generally have the same reactions as I had. they or laugh at the idea of a Mexican demon called ‘Charlie’, they or think a thoughtform might be created, or suggest that any stray spirit will use the occasion to play… No-one seems very enthusiastic about this game…
(No, the bogus idea that all people who are into the occult are part of a worldwide Satanic conspiracy against Christianity is actually nonsense. )

And this brings me to my last point: if indeed, as some say, occultism is on the rise in Western cultures, then there are 2 opposing things we should avoid at all cost. (I’m speaking to both my Christian audience and all the others here)
The first one is to laugh it all away from a naturalist/materialist perspective². The second one is the classical ‘demons of the gaps’ approach, in which everything that is even remotely seen as ‘occult’ or even paranormal is attributed to ‘demons’, and all people who engage in such things pushed away as dangerous  devil-worshippers. Neither of both is very helpful for different reasons, and we will need a more nuanced approach, both in communication with those who are engaged in the occult as in approaching the ‘invisible’ itself.

What do you think?

Bram

° The idea of using iphone-apps to connect to the spirit world and make connections to demons (Mexican or not) does have some terrifying implications that I won’t venture into here. It’s too much the stuff of anime and comics…

* Sending demons away in the name of Jesus Christ is the most simple Christian ‘banishing ritual’ which is quite effective if you stand in the Power of Jesus. If you are not a Christian or do not live connected to the Living Christ, using the name of Christ just as a spell is not a good idea, it might result in the spirit answering “Jesus I know, and Paul I know about, but who are you?” and still bothering you, as happened to the sons of Sceva in acts 15..

² Atheism as a paradigm, combined a strond disbelief in the supernatural, can indeed work as a medium-strong shield to not encounter anything supernatural/paranormal, just as believing in it does surely help to encounter it. But don’t count on that to always work… (see also this post)
Quite chaos magick anyway to use a paradigm and the power of belief to manifest it…

Conversion


Conversion is more than a change in direction, it’s a change in connection. (Frank Viola & Len Sweet’)

I was recently re-reading the introduction to A Jesus Manifesto jesusmanifestby Frank Viola and Len Sweet, a book that urges Christians to put Christ at the centre of their faith in very powerful language, when my eye fell a sentence which seemed to be filing in a gap in my thoughts somewhere, even though I can’t even exactly say why. But it did remind me that there are much more different factors in conversion than most people think of….

Conversion is more than a change in direction, it’s a change in connection.

Conversion, often simply seen as the change of religion, which can be more accurately be described as the turning towards Something Higher that hadn’t an important place in someones life before, deeply impacts a person, and it does not happen overnight. One does not just become a Christian, or Marxist, or modern Pagan, or very convinced atheist without changes on different levels or domains of their lives.

There are at least 4 different levels that I will explore in this post.
Edit: Note that I’m only talking about the individual level here, and thus about conversion of a human being in one lifetime, not of his family or culture over the generations…. Shifting baseline is a very strong factor here, and things like forced conversions will play out very differently over a longer time and beyond individuals… Even the kakure kirishitans are not recognisable as Catholics anymore…

Intellectual acceptance of information
This is the lowest level of what happens during conversion, and if it happens it’s  not actually a conversion at all yet. Just accepting information as true in the abstract can be a step in a conversion, but it’s not at all the most important thing, even though some atheists and Christian apologists use all their energy to work on this domain. At least that that’s what I would conclude from the way they try to convert people by using a lot of reasoning and logic.(I suppose  personality type is very important here too.)

The issue is that belief and faith are not the same thing at all. Belief is accepting information, while faith is trusting Someone/something. Americans who have faith in the constitution don’t believe that the document exists, but that it is important, and that it should be followed because it will bring liberty for all and yadda yadda… Christians should have faith in God, and thus trust God to take care for them in some kind of way. (See psalm 23 for example) Mere belief in something that goes against the naturalist worldview is not ‘religion’ at all. It is often part of religion, but some people can have just a very intuitive connection to God (or another deity) with no concrete beliefs at all, only a deep natural connection. That’s what faith is, not just ticking the box before every line of the creed…

Acceptance of a Reality in a Paradigm shift
This is a step deeper, and goes beyond the rational to the acceptance of a Reality that is percieved in one way of the other, and thus accepted. Often a paradigm shift happens when the data don’t seem to fit with the beliefs held, and the old worldview is rendered obsolete by the actual world as encountered by the person. This is often not a choice, but a realisation that just needs to be surrendered to.

On the other hand, just accepting a reality does not convert anyone either. I can believe_800happily accept the existence of Loki, fairies, or the information in Marx’ das kapital’ without converting to anything at all. A lot of people believe in God, not just as information but a knowledge of a Reality, without doing anything with it.
That’s no conversion at all yet.
Only if I make a connection and change my life towards one of the things I’ve acknowledged as a reality I really convert myself..

Polytheists are very interesting in this regard. They acknowledge the existence all kinds of gods, but that doesn’t mean that their path involves all of them. The polytheist will have connection with certain gods or deities and not with others that are as real to them, just as a human I do have friendship with certain people and not with others, even though I do completely believe in their existence…

So what’s needed for a real conversion is not just accepting how reality is, but aligning ourselves with that Reality.

Change in direction
So a  change in direction is what is often seen as a definition of conversion. You change your ways, and thus convert. ‘Repent and follow me’ is what Jesus said.
But there is a-one problem: this still can be completely outward, or in other words, fake. One can pretend to convert, and change outward ways without having any conversion at all.

Forced conversions for example are often lacking in this area. People are outwardly converting to the new religion, and become nominal Christians, or Marxists, or Muslims, but in their heart and behind closed door they remain connected to their old gods or God. Crypto-paganism probably lived on underground for centuries after the moment when Christians or Muslims made their religion the State religion.

The same has happened with Christians under rule of other religions that 330px-Maria_Kannonexpected them to convert, sometimes under threat of death too. The Japanese kakure kirishitans are a fascination excample of that: the Japanese Catholic Church went undergound during the Edo period after the Shimabara Rebellion in the 1630s when Catholicism became forbidden, and remained hidden until recent times, slowly evolving to something hardly recognisable.

No-one can really be forced to convert. It’s easier to take someones life than to take away the connection they have with their God in some cases. True believers will keep their connection no matter what happens…

Making a New Connection
Real conversion is also making a New Connection, as Frank Viola and Len Sweet said in the original . Not just an outward change in direction, but an inward change in connection.
We turn away from our former values, and gods, and embrace Something New that will guide our life, and connect with it.
When we become Christians we will from now on follow Christ, make Him the center of our life, and build our life around Him.
Others see that the deep Truth in Marx’ writings calls us to change not only our lives but the world for better. Or or give ourself over to the Higher Truth of science and reason because there’s nothing else to demand our obedience as source and truth. And so on… But it is only when we make the connection to whatever Higher thing we have come to believe in as real, that we really convert…

This does have several implications for us as Christians, as well as for others I suppose…

what do you think?

peace

Bram

Bram Cools Music: ‘Father I am tired’ + more contemporary Christian Muzak to come…


Hi readers,Mangocoffeesepia

Probably not everyone reading my blog is aware that I am also one of the most unknown musicians on the planet, but for those interested in my music, here is an update.

The Bram Cools classic ‘Father I am tired’, can now be heard and downloaded in a previously unheard version here  on my soundclcoud. Or click on the coffee if you like.
(Yes, for those who wonder: all instruments and vocals -including the choir!- are just Bram in this one!)

The rest of the news is that this upload of ‘Father I am tired’ can be also seen as the first ‘single’ announcing a coming electronic release of the old ‘Contemporary Christian Muzak’ songs, finally together on one album! This should have happened 5 years ago, but still it’s better soon than never.

For the uninitiated: Years ago now I had a band called the Contemporary Christian Muzak collective (or CCMC). We tried to play some kind of experimental Christian music that did both connect to the Creator and make some interesting sounds that haven’t been used 100 times before already. Most of it was not exactly elevator music for a boring Christian radio station providing safe happy clappy Christioa music for the conservative middleclass as the name might suggest, but raither some kind of rough folky indierock, mixed with very weird free-from noise and experimental impro-parts as well from time to time…

We only did a few concerts throughout the years but we did have a lot of fun, and I really miss those days! But time passes and things change, and the bandmembers had families and other bands and other stuff going on, so it all sort of fell apart. Unfortunately We never did any studio-recordings as a band, and no real CD-worthy live recordings have been made either. So all that’s left is my own home-recorded multitrack-versions with mostly myself on a lot of instruments, some of which were never finished. Finishing them is what we’re going to do now, so that in the near future everybody can listen to Contemporary Christian Muzak as much as they want…

I hope you all enjoy the song and share it with others who might like it.

peace

Bram

Some interesting links elsewhere (April 2015)


zone50I seem very busy at the moment, with ideas in my head that don’t get the chance to be converted into blogposts. But here is my list of interesting links elsewhere for April 2015 nonetheless…

(Picture is from my new DeviantArt, where I put some of my very unprofessional photographs from time to time now… And yes, I do like Sepia a lot!)

by Christian Piatt. Not that I agree with everything (I don’t even think I really understand the exact Buddhist meaning of ‘ego’ -I don’t think many Christians do- although I disagree with ‘the self is an illusion, but Western Christianity is way too ego-driven sometimes!)

The blogpost Am I really a Lesbian? at the spiritual apocalypse blog. Written by a lesbian woman married to another woman, but a completely different angle than a lot of things I regularly read. (Much more Christlike if you ask me)

These animals might go extinct because no-one wants to eat them (yes, really!)

Another one to read and work through, whether or not you agree with it or not: Social justice bullies: the authoritarianism of millenial social justice.  There indeed is a lot of very agrressive, unloving and not very rational discourse going on under the guise of ‘social justice’ these days, especially from the US.

Why Jesus is Anti-Capitalist by Micah Bales. Duh…

Another sign that Christians need to get away from both materialist reductionism on one hand and weird sensational supernaturalism on the other hand and  acknowledge the spiritual world in a more humble and dare I say, rational way: (at the Wartburg Watch) I can remember Wagner having influennce on the Charismatic circles, and I do know these sorts of ‘spiritual mapping’, but this is just dangerous nonsense which has nothing to do with Jesus or the bible. Why so some want to see demons an the like eveyrwhere where they aren’t (without  noticing them where they actually are), completely sidetracking God and Jesus in the process??

Faith in the system, or faith in Jesus? by Chaplain mike at internetmonk with a nice picture of Charles Darwin himself: “I was impressed anew at how evangelical Christianity comes across as faith in a system rather than faith in the person of Jesus Christ.
(Which reminds me for some reason of the Omian religion in Terry Prachett’s ‘small gods)

Completely unrelated: newly discovered small flying dinosaur (not a pterosaur!)  loooking like an inbetween form between bats and birds

I personally do think that our Western tendency for divorce, and making other things more interesting than relationships are much more to blame for this than ‘gay marriage’.  why would anyone still believe in marriage as defined by our cultures when most of them around us fall apart?

The Muslim man who chose to die alonSonhgside the Ethiopian Christian martyrs

I do like things that connect with global Christianity. So I want to learn this Song heard around the world , which I don’t know but is based on a verse I have been trying to write a song from too, although I’ve never finished it.

From Steve in S-Africa: Xenophobia, xenomisia, and the failure of transformation: Xenophobia and xenomisia taken together mean “the fear and loathing of foreigners”, and that fear and loathing undoubtedly exists in some circles.

Dan Brennan reviews Spiritual Friendship: Finding Love in the Church as a Celibate Gay Christian on John H. Armstrongs blog, and gives an interesting plea against the Freudianised friendship ethics of a lot of Evangelicals…

Just interpret this however you want: Female chimps making, wielding spears . Maybe weapons were invented by women after all from an evolutionary POV. No idea what this would mean to romantic feminists who say men disrupted the balance…

Anything that caught your eyes this month?

Bram

Some interesting links Elsewhere (March 2015)


tussi

March 2015 was a strange month, with time running in weird circles, computer problems and not that much time to read articles, so my list of interesting links elsewhere is quite short, and one day later than planned…
(Picture by myself, ‘kleinhoefblad’ (Tussilago) is a sign of spring here, but yellow is hard to get right on photograph with my small cheap camera;…)

I linked on FB to a article called The Joy of Promiscuity this month., because I liked the pictures even… Yes, my interests are diverse and this one really might not be for everybody…  (It’s about breeding perennial kales… What DID you think?)

What scares the new atheists by John Gray, himself an atheist but not impressed by Dawkins and Co.

The antimodern musings of the Orthodox Father Stephen resume with the provocatively titled post saving a democratic man.

Filmmakers move away from white Jesus. Which is not a bad idea, but moving away from American Jesus might even be more needed (be it Hollywood or the American ‘conservative’ version… There are wrong ways of representing Jesus in a culturally coloured way that go much deeper than just skin colour..

10 bad reasons to become Pagan; This one makes me wonder: what are good and what are bad reasons for being a Christian (or atheist for that matter)

Pope Francis: A Christian who does not protect creation ‘does not care about the work of God’ <– This friend speaks my mind…

Micael from Sweden about an American pastor named Dollar and stuff like that: Why You Shouldn’t be Rich: The Poor and the Climate Can’t Afford it

There are no heroes in the kingdom of God by Paul Munn

Why it is important to recognise there are diverse sources of diversity. by Matt Stone on curious Christian.

What can Christians learn from neo-pagans and ‘magickal’ traditions?


esoMatt Stone at curious Christian recently asked the question “Can Evangelicals Learn from Occult Traditions?” on his blog. It’s a questions that deserves way more comments and discussions than he did get. In it he did refer in his post to a book with a similar title called ‘Can evangelicals learn from world religions’ by Gerald R. McDermott that I haven’t read but that looks very interesting.

McDermott wrote a superb book entitled, “Can Evangelicals Learn from World Religions?” The text explored the ways theologians of the likes of Augustine, Thomas Aquinas and John Calvin had historically engaged with Pagan philosophers of the likes of Plato and Aristotle and asked what a similar exercise might look like today. In the process McDermott explored aspects of Buddhism, Daoism, Confucianism and Islam that Christians, evangelicals included, could profit from … even if only to rediscover forgotten aspects of their own tradition.

I do believe that every tradition, Christian or otherwise, is most likely to have things we can learn from, and things we should not learn at all. So I would definitely answer the question with ‘yes’, and for my own post (which is also part of the March 2015 Synchroblog – What I Appreciate About [Other Religions] I will broaden it a bit “What can evangelicals learn from neo-Pagans and ‘magickal’ traditions?’.

I’ve been having online conversations with neo-pagans, witches, other ‘occult’ folk and newagy types for a while now. A lot of my prejudices, weird stereotypes and outright lies that some Christians told me about them were shattered there, and I did meet a lot of wise and interesting people (as well as negative creeps and dangerous idiots, but Christians, atheists or Muslims do have those as well…), and I did learn a lot of things from them.

(Yes, I might have entered conversations and places that wouldn’t have been safe without Divine protection and the gift of spiritual discernment, but hanging out with other people, even Christians isn’t without risks either and might require the same amount of discernment and Divine protection actually…)

So what could we learn from Occultists, neo-pagans, wiccans and others who practice magick as a part of their religion?

1. Recover some of what we’ve lost in modernity
Modernity as we know it is a strange place for Christianity to find and contextualise itself, and getting too modernised can be quite dangerous for the Christian faith even. (Which is true both sides of modern Christianity, fundamentalism and liberal Christianity, although often in opposite ways)
A lot of modern Christians for example are quite handicapped when it comes to the ‘invisible world’ after what the enlightenment did to our culture. (See also Thoughts about the spiritual ecological naivete of modern Westerners for a more thorough exploration of that problem)
There is much more than meets the eye and can be dreamt of in our modernist philosophies, but even if we try to go there can can really struggle with finding ways to understand and conceptualise it from our modern paradigm in a way that makes sense…
Yes, we lost a lot in the age of disentchantment that protestantism and the Christian renaissance-humanism of Erasmus started and that has been influencing us for roughly 500 years now, creating a very non-supernatural world for us. (Which might ironically be the biggest magical trick ever , seeOur nonmagical modern world as the biggest magical trick ever…)
But Christianity is deeply connected with the supernatural world, and has a lot of claims that are quite useless in a purely naturalist/materialist paradigm. Which is not so strange; Christianity as we know it has pagan and Jewish roots, not enlightenment ones, and was born inside of a much more enchanted world than ours. And no matter how hard we try, we won’t make much sense of a lot of the gospel writings without an understanding of a world that is more than our modern materialist one.

Pentecostalism and Charismatic Christianity are probably one of the ways in which the Spirit sent us a correction of this disenchanted false worldview, but sometimes even those religions are through and through modern in a photonegative way. And here it can be interesting to connect with those who have retained their connection with the supernatural. (Yes, I know neo-Paganism and Wicca are mostly modern reconstructions, but we still can learn a lot from how they try to make sense of the Spiritual world in modernity sometimes.) I also think that the thoroughly postmodern chaos magick and its chaosunderstanding of paradigm shifting could have taught the emerging church a lot that it needed to not fall into the rigid and very dogmatic bounded-set neo-left-liberal trap that it ended up in… Which doesn’t make sense for a disappointed postmodern oecemenical evangelical as myself…
(See also: Some postmodern paradigm-shifting: from C.S. Lewis to chaos magic and back…)

2. See who the other really is without prejudices
In some Christian circles there are very scary views of ‘the occult’ that are worse than fiction, and that should be placed in the library net to stuff like the medieval maleus maleficarum. Some people even paint a view of non-Christians being just different groups of demon-influenced groups that all work together to hinder Christianity,  mostly in the form they regard as ‘the one true faith’, liberal Christians or even churches who have a slighly different view on god knows what bible verse might even be on the other side too with all of the other evil infidels… Which does not mean that there’s a lot of dark stuff going on among the magickal folk, but sometimes what Christians think occultism is is complete nonsense. (Take this Carman song as a good example)

We should never forget that as Christians we should care for the truth, and not spread lies about anyone, not even about Satanists. (most of which follow Anton Lavey and don’t believe in the entity Christians call Satan anyway) So it is always etremely inmportant to listen to people and let them self-identify instead of spreading wild stories and conspiracy theory. And even if we completely disagree with what someone believes we should not distort it if we describe it.

A lot of Christian descriptions of ‘occultism’ are not just slander but just outright ridiculous. Frank Peretti in his ‘darkness’ books for example lets new agers, devil-worshipping Satanists and atheists work together to oppose Christians (of a very conservative American variety). I’ve you’ve ever met people of any of those groups, the chance that they will work together and have common goals with the other 2 groups are not bigger than with fundamentalist Christianity. No atheist will like new-age or satanist superstition more than Christian superstition. A Satan-worshipper will not bother with secular atheism andd look down upon fluffy new-age BS. And no Newager in his right mind (hmmm) will get involved with either inverse-Christian Satanism or a worldview that excludes the supernatural…

Most of these people are not concerned with opposing Christianity, except where it hinders them in being who they are and doing what they want to do. If people are opposed they will try to stop that opposition. But non-Christians who agree with the Christian ideas about God and that want to oppose that God are quite rare. Most have totally different ideas about God/gods/the Divine/whatever… and are not interested in fighting with a misconception although they might fight the power of Christianity when in power, or criticise the things they see wrong in it (sometimes rightly). People generally do not want to attack a God they don’t believe in. Opposing God as Christians see Him is meaningless and out of the question for most non-Christians. There is no specific anti-God conspiracy!

So it can be very interesting to just talk with people like neo-Pagans, Wiccans, and others and let them explain what they believe and practice in their own words. FB groups like the Pagan and Christian moot or Watchtower are very interesting here for example.

It’s true there are a lot of people in and far beyond magickal traditions that are not very positive towards Christians. But that’s often because Christians have been very negative towards them. The least we can do as Christians is try to listen, try to understand who they are. They are all humans like us, and a  lot of them want to do a lot of good in their own way. And there’s really a lot of people in those communities who have been hurt and are still regularly hurt by Christians  who spread all kind of weird accusations about them. Nothing Christlike about that, we can do a lot better, guys!

3. Acknowledge the parallels and learn from them
This will probably be my most controversial point here. But yes, studying magick (even if it’s in theory in my own case) as a Christian can open our eyes to certain parallels between certain beliefs and practices within Christianity and paganism or magickal/occult traditions. (Let’s not forget here that most Western Occult traditions are derived from Christianity btw., except for paganism, Wicca,chaos magick and the like… )

Yes there are parallels between ‘energy healing’ and faith healing, and there is a lot more to say about ‘Divine energies’ (an Eastern Orthodox concept). Jesus seems to be doing forms of ‘magick’ in some of his miracles.  We can even see shamanic motifs in the gospels. (this bible study by ‘Captain Longpost’ on Marks gospel on the Pagan and Christian Moot forum is recommended for everyone.)

A lot of magick is done with the invocation/evocation of deities or other entities, and our Christians prayer can be seen as in the same category. We are oathed to Christ, the incarnation of the Creator of the Multiverse, and we do find our spiritual power and authority in Him.
This does not mean that other gods do not exist btw, we only do not regard them as gods to worship as Christians. My view about them is that they are more on angel/archangel level than the same species as the Supreme Being anyway…

But there also is a grey zone with human power that most people don’t believe in… A lot of magick is about projecting strong will (think also about ‘the secret’, ‘the law of attraction’ and even pop-chaos magick sigils) and recognising this can help us discern where Christians move outside of Christianity to revert to human magick. Without being focussed on God miracles are not something to be impressed by, and not something that needs to even be connected with Christianity at all. Just magick… And some ‘name it and claim it’ stuff very easily rolls into these kinds of magick, with a lot of miracles and rock’n roll going on…

…while Elvis has left the building already…

What we should never forget as Christians
We should not forget that as Christians, we are ‘oathed to Christ’. We are to root ourselves in God, the Ultimate Reality, Ground of Being, Creator of the universe through the incarnated and resurrected Christ, God-with-us, and through His Spirit in and around us. It is important to see this as a Reality, not just an article of faith to intellectually accept. Heaven and Earth are full of His Glory, as the ancient Hosannah-hymn says. In Him we live, in Him we move, in Him we have our being…

We live in a Spiritual world that is bigger than we can understand or grasp, and more Real than we can perceive with our senses. The material dimension is only one part of it (although not unimportant to us embodied beings, and apparently to God, who incarnated in one of us!).

One of the most-neglected but most-needed gfts of the Spirit might be the discernment of Spirits. I do think we should all ask the Holy Spirit for a bigger dose of that, and not only when we participate in interfaith dialogue with world religions or magickal folk, but also within Christianity. A lot of stuff, from theology to miracles does have other sources than the Holy Spirit, sometimes human, sometimes darker than that. And we often don’t recognise that at all…

shalom

Bram

This post is part of the the March 2015 Synchroblog – What I Appreciate About [Other Religions].  Be sure to read the other participants too::

Some interesting things elsewhere (Februari 2015)


glycymerisAs we approach the end of the month, it’s time to post the new list with ‘some interesting things elsewhere’.  The picture is indeed from ‘elsewhere’ (my offline life even) and is a fossil Glycymeris-shell I found when I was walking along the river Nete here in Lier, Belgium. Most likely a Pliocene Glycymeris varabilis if my determination attempts are correct.

Let’s go from the Pliocene to pre-Christian paganism, or at leeast the reconstructed forms of it: Last month I posted about the New Norse temple in Iceland, the first in 1000 years. If you want to know more about the reconstructed paganism, here is an interview that the ‘highpriest’ Hilmar Örn Hilmarsson in 3 parts: part 1, part 2, part 3. And I also found an older article a new beginning for Greek Paganism too. It seems that our myth of secularisation and linear evolutionary views of religion need some serious reconsidering…

There are certain blogs I will tell you to read every time I get the chance. Lana Hope with Confirmation Bias, Worldview Bias, and Arguments for and Against God’s Existence. Eric from the Jawbone of an ass with The Gods By Any Other Names.  Some criticism of our modern economic views on Holy Spirit activism in The Economy of Need and the Economy of Greed.

Sarah Moon with 16 Things That Happened When I Went to The Creation Museum. Seems to be quite a weird place if you ask me….

Some myth-busting about the middle ages. (I don’t know why it is mostly a certain kind of atheists that like to perpetuate this kind of ahistorical lies, but it can be very annoying and I frankly do expect more from people whose highest ideal is ‘reason’)

David Wilkersons book ‘the cross and the Switchblade’, about how he as a country preacher went to the street gangs of NY in the fifties to bring the good news of Jesus, and did some quite spectacular things was very important for me as a teenager. So reading this on the Wartburg Watch about the organisation he started saddens me a lot: Is Teen Challenge an Abusive Rehab Program?
The Quaker Testimony of… Truthiness? by Micah Bales. How seriously do we take ‘let your yes be yes and your no be no’?

If you want to join the secret society of the Illuminati, please visit their site. And oh, download their printable black’n white folder in  PDF. If I were the most mighty secret society on Earth I’d definitely have a printable black’n white folder in PDF on my website…

Carl McColman with Seven hopes for the Christian (and church) of the future. Based in Karl Rahner’s saying that ‘the Christian of the future will be a mystic or will not exist at all’, a sentiment which I echo…

New Aaron Strumpel record: Bright Star

(And oh, if you missed my re-release of a very obscure Bram Cools CD-R from my ‘Contemporary Christian Muzak’ period last month and you like obscure Christian lo-fi; go here: CCM II: psalms and prayers in lo-fi)

Twitter bio generator: “Twitter advocate. Devoted coffee evangelist. Wannabe food maven. Amateur travel fan.” Not me, but there are probably a lot of people on twitter to whom it would apply…

Bill Kinnon on Narcissistic and/or Psychopathic Church Leadership.  It seems to me that narcissists in leadership are always dangerous, but are also very common. It might cost us our planet one day…

Christian supernatural author Laura Cowan with Coming out psychic. Raises some interesting questions… Coming out with this kind of abilities doesn’t fare well in either conservative Christian (evil demon-possessed occultist!)vor certain atheist circles (such things are not real because Science™, please let them cure you and don’t  disturb our materialist worldview…)

 What did you see that was interesting this month?

Bram